Why Are Compressors Measured in Tons?

When we look at compressors, there are a lot of numbers going around, but one of the bigger ones is the Tons. We sell compressors in all manner of weight-ratings, from less than a ton to hundreds of tons. The thing is though, this doesn’t mean we need a crane and a massive truck to load the compressor before it ships out. Compressor tonage is not actually a measure of weight. In fact, it is the result of some weird and convoluted math and history.   Old Fashioned AC Before we had the modern air conditioner, there were just a handful of ways to actually cool a room or a building. You could open a window, sit in front of a fan, use an evaporative cooler, or get a block of ice. That’s right, once upon a time we didn’t just have “ice boxes”, we had ice-conditioning too. The precursor to modern refrigeration was massive chunks of ice, usually cut from frozen lakes in the north and hastily delivered anywhere cooling was needed. You would go down to your local ice house and buy however much your fridge or cooling system needed. For building-scale cooling, there would be a block of ice essentially placed in a special cabinet in the air ducts and fans would blow air over it. The ice would remove heat from the air and melt. The air would be cooled and circulated around the room or […]

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Electrical Measurements Explained

What does 24 Volts, @ 15 amps mean? What is a watt? What’s a watt-hour? What about an amp-hour? These are all crucial ways of measuring how much electricity is present, at what rates, and just how much that electricity wants to move. We are going to be greatly simplifying these concepts, so as always, consult an electrician before working on or making any electrically involved decisions. Volts and Amps We’re going to start with the basics: What’s in the wire. The wires around you contain electrons. The movement of these electrons is electricity. When there is electricity, such as a light switch being turned on, electrons are moving through  the wire, creating magnetic fields and heat, among other things. Volts are the amount of force pushing those electrons. A low voltage source such as a double A battery has just enough force inside it to make electrons move through a wire. It doesn’t quite have enough force to shoot electrons into the air and make lightning like an industrial transformer could. The flow of these electrons is called Current, which we measure in Amps (amperes). It’s easiest to picture the current as a flow-rate, “one gallon per hour.” We can measure the total amount of amps with an Amp-Hour. For example, if we have a pump that needs 10 Amps to run, and it runs for One Hour, that it runs at 10 Amp-Hours. In 24 hours, it will […]

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What is a Flame Sensor?

If a roll out switch is a master “things have gone horribly wrong, stop the show” switch and thermisters are basically limited to measuring temperature, how do we know the burner is actually making a flame? Sure, the thermister will read heat, but that takes time. Imagine the igniter has failed, it takes maybe 10-40 seconds to register enough heat to confirm a flame. The combustion chamber is now pumped full of a potentially explosive fuel mixture and nothing is happening. We need something much, much faster, we need a flame sensor.   How Not to Detect a Flame The way a person knows something is on fire is usually the bright flames and the fact that sticking their hand near it becomes really painful. This approach doesn’t quite work for a furnace. We could measure the light output, that requires more processing power to interpret the data, some incredibly sensitive hardware to detect the tiniest start of a flame, and it doesn’t work on every fuel type. There are systems that work this way, but it’s a little more expensive. We could measure the temperature, but we run into challenges with making a sensor you can shove in the heart of a flame for years on end without failure. It has been done, but it’s expensive. There are however, laws of physics we can exploit to detect a flame without anywhere near so many challenges. We can detect a […]

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