Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Last week we covered how a draft inducer and it’s attached pressure sensor can help prevent Carbon Monoxide from leaking out of a furnace. This week we’re moving up to the next line of defense: a dedicated Carbon Monoxide Detector. These are often installed in new homes and offices as required by local building codes in most of the United States. Where they’re not installed by construction, they’re usually installed by the facility’s owner as a precaution.   What’s the Big Deal? Carbon Monoxide is one of the deadliest, common compounds in the world. It’s is a colorless, odorless gas that will kill you at the right concentrations. There’s only two ways for someone to know they’ve been exposed to a harmful dose: Use a detector or Recognise the Symptoms before it’s too late. The initial symptoms include headache, dizziness, weakness, vomitting, chest pain, and confusion. In large part, these common symptoms can be attributed to hundreds of other ailments, including the common flu. Greater exposure can lead to passing out, arrhythmia, seizures, and death. Even then, there will be longterm complications, including memory problems, movement disabilities, and fatigue. Most people are not able to detect and react to these symptoms as Carbon Monoxide poisoning before it’s too late. They’re often waived off as a flue or some other lesser problem until it’s too late.   How Do We Detect An Invisible, Colorless, Odorless Gas? While Carbon Monoxide itself is […]

Read More →

Introduction to Fire Alarms

Automation is essential in our industry. We have machines that regulate our air temperature, that provide a constant supply of hot and cold water, that control massive industrial processes, and more. Employees, clients, and managers want to just walk in, be comfortable, and get to work. We all overlook one of the most essential, automated things we have: the Fire Safety System.     Old Fire Safety The hardware we use for safety today has a remarkably long history. Fire suppression can be traced at least as far back as Leonardo Da Vinci, who’s sprinkler system essentially washed away an entire kitchen. Fire alarms go back to the 1600s, when there were literal patrols in search of fire, much as police patrol in search of crime or emergencies. Overtime, there were systems of telegraphs used for fire alarms and gun powder triggered sprinklers. These older systems spread for their insurance benefits. A building with a sprinkler system would have significantly cheaper insurance rates. It would ultimately pay for itself. The difference between sprinklers and no sprinklers is that significant.   Modern Fire Safety Today, things are more extensive. Telegraph alarm systems and gun powder sprinklers gave way to extensive electronics that interact with every single part of your building. It all starts with the sensors and detectors. In a modern system, every single smoke detector has a unique ID and name in the system. If the elevator maintenance room detector […]

Read More →